Things tagged 'consultation'

limited to the area of Westminster Cycling Campaign:

62 issues found for 'consultation':

  • Pembridge Square to Meanwhile Gardens Cycle Route

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Pembridge Square to Meanwhile Gardens Cycle Route Consultation

    The Council wants to create high quality cycle routes for people who have considered cycling, but been put off by the idea of sharing busy roads with lorries and buses. We hope that many existing cyclists will also appreciate being able to use clear, direct routes along quiet side streets.

    We are consulting on a new cycle route, linking the existing cycle route known as Quietway 2 in Notting Hill to the route along the Grand Union Canal. It begins at Pembridge Square, crosses Pembridge Villas/Pembridge Road and runs along Pembridge Crescent, Denbigh Road, Colville Road, Colville Gardens, Clydesdale Road, All Saints Rd, Tavistock Crescent, passes under the Westway then along Acklam Road, St Ervan’s Road, Golborne Road and in to Meanwhile Gardens where cyclists can connect to the existing cycle route along the canal towpath. In general, the measures that we are proposing are designed to slow down traffic, or to reduce the risk of conflict at junctions.

    Complete the survey

    We are asking what you think of our proposals regarding the new cycle route. Please read the following information carefully before filling in the survey no later than 29 March 2019. For further information, please contact cycling@rbkc.gov.uk or call 020 7361 3766.

    Proposed changes

    On the southern section of Pembridge Square, we are proposing three sinusoidal humps to reduce traffic speeds. Sinusoidal humps are designed so that when driving or cycling over them at lower speeds, they are more comfortable to drive over than traditional humps, but if travelling at an inappropriate speed, they cause a notable ‘bump’, encouraging slower speeds. We know that some people are concerned that road humps contribute to poor air quality, when they lead to drivers braking and accelerating hard. We have designed the proposals in line with government guidance on the correct spacing between the humps to avoid hard braking and acceleration. We have recently introduced sinusoidal humps in St James’s Gardens and we also use them when we resurface roads with traditional humps – for example, in Abbotsbury Road near Holland Park.  

    To the western end of Pembridge Square, where there is a very large expanse of asphalt, we are proposing a new island with planting, and clearer road markings to clarify how vehicles should navigate this section of the square.

    To allow less confident cyclists to cross Pembridge Villas/Pembridge Road, we are proposing to convert the existing pedestrian crossing to a parallel crossing. Parallel crossings combine a pedestrian zebra with a crossing for people travelling by bicycle, so that people attempting to cross on bikes enjoy the same priority as pedestrians. We have installed similar crossings with success on North Pole Road and King’s Road.

    The proposed design also includes widening the pavements on either side of this proposed crossing to provide more space for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as reducing the crossing distance. Raising the level of the carriageway on the two side roads to pavement level at the junction with Pembridge Road, Pembridge Square and Pembridge Crescent would also help to discourage high speeds and provide a more comfortable crossing for pedestrians. 

    On Westbourne Grove, we propose moving the bus stop road markings slightly further away from the junction with Denbigh Road. This will involve the loss of one parking space, but would allow greater visibility of oncoming traffic for all road users exiting Denbigh Road. Introducing double yellow lines around this junction would further increase visibility for all road users by discouraging inappropriate parking. We also propose to re-work the pedestrian crossing so that it better aligns with the carriageway of Colville Road.  

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  • Camden's Clean Air Action Plan 2019-2022

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    Camden’s Clean Air Action Plan has been produced as part of our duty to London Local Air Quality Management. It outlines the action we will take to improve air quality in Camden between 2019 and 2022.

    Apologies for very late posting

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  • Kensington & Chelsea LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    The Mayor of London published his Transport Strategy (MTS) in March 2018. The aim is for 80 per cent of all trips in London to be made on foot, by cycle or using public transport by 2041 (compared with 63 per cent in 2015).

    Our Third LIP sets out how we plan to implement the MTS locally as well as our other local transport-related priorities. LIPs are statutory documents and all London boroughs must prepare and submit their LIPs to Transport for London (TfL) for Mayor of London approval. See the MTS on the London.gov website.

    There are four main elements of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea's LIP:

    • A set of Borough Transport Objectives covering the 2019/20 to 2021/22 three-year LIP period and beyond.
    • The transport challenges and opportunities that we face in the borough.
    • A Delivery Plan of schemes, initiatives and policies covering the period 2019/20 to 2021/22.
    • LIP targets and delivery indicators.
    The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Commonplace survey

    To help shape the themes of our LIP we ran an online map-based ‘Commonplace’ survey during the summer of 2018, inviting people to tell us the kind of transport improvements they would like to see in their local area. See the online map.

    407 people responded to the question ‘What is your biggest concern about getting around on Kensington and Chelsea's streets? Amongst all respondents the top five concerns in descending order were:

    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • too much rat-running
    • congestion for cars

    Amongst those who stated that they lived in the borough the top five concerns were:

    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • congestion for cars
    • too much rat-running
    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    Key projects, policies and initiatives proposed in our LIP include:
    • considering pedestrians’ wish for ‘green man’ facilities at busy junctions, which will reduce traffic capacity and increase queues, even if these would not have the traditional road casualty based justification
    • consulting on introducing pilot 20 mph limits in some streets and areas
    • examining TfL's proposals to improve conditions for walking and cycling along the Holland Park Avenue/Notting Hill Gate/Bayswater Road corridor
    • introducing one or more ‘floating’ car clubs, which allow customers to make one-way trips, paying by the minute, without having to return the car to a dedicated bay
    • reviewing the case for taking on powers to enforce moving traffic offences, such as yellow box junctions and banned turns, to make sure road users observe traffic restrictions
    • a trial of part-time ‘school streets’ in which motor vehicle access is limited at school drop-off and pick-up times to encourage children to walk to school and improve safety
    • considering opportunities to introduce restrictions to move traffic away from residential roads in some circumstances
    • working with TfL to find sites for rapid electric vehicle chargers
    Send us your comments on our Draft LIP

    We welcome your views on our draft LIP and the Environmental Report. If you have any comments please complete the survey online or Alternatively  you can email them to lip3@rbkc.gov.uk or send them by post to:

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  • Brent LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Statutory and public consultation on their draft documents is a requirement for Boroughs preparing their Local Implementation Plans. The draft London Borough of Brent Local Implementation Transport Plan (LIP3) sets out how the Borough Council proposes to implement the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy at a local level in Brent. The plan uses the Borough’s Long Term Transport Strategy objectives and sets out how the future of transport for Brent will be provided up to 2041. It proposes a three-year programme of investment for the period 2019/20 - 2021/22. Under the Mayor’s Transport Strategy a further three year programme will be consulted on in the future. The full draft plan is available in the document section below. We would welcome your views on the draft LIP3 using this online questionnaire.

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  • Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood Projects

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    "As part of the Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood (LEN), Westminster City Council is proposing to introduce a number of new measures around Marylebone High Street and Paddington Street. These interventions will sit alongside the behaviour change measures already undertaken as part of the LEN programme."

    "Projects
    Details of these proposals are set out below, showing the existing and proposed arrangements, as well as information on the rationale. Once implemented, these proposals will be the first of their kind in Westminster. If you would like to comment on the proposals or have any questions, please email info@marylebonelen.org by 11.59pm on 5th December 2018. Responses will be considered before proceeding with the next stages of design and implementation."

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  • Westminster City Plan 2019-2040

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    Westminster City Council is consulting on its City Plan for the period 2019-2040. This is the Council's local plan, which sets out local planning policies and identifies how land is used, determining what will be built where.

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  • TfL's proposed changes to junctions along Edgware Road

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    From TfL webpage https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/edgware-road/ :
    "We are proposing changes to junctions along Edgware Road, between the Marylebone Flyover and Marble Arch, which will improve safety for pedestrians, and other road users.

    Our proposals include:

    - Creating new pedestrian crossings, with green and red man signals
    - Adding count down timers to new and existing crossings
    - Creating more space for pedestrians on the pavement
    - Limiting speed for vehicles to 20 miles per hour
    - Providing new Advanced Stop Lines (cycle boxes) for cyclists"

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  • Oxford Street District Place Strategy and Delivery Plan

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Westminster Council says:

    The draft strategy sets out a series of ambitious, exciting and also deliverable recommendations to significantly improve the district as a whole, with 96 projects across 87 different streets and spaces. We’ve also identified nine zones that reflect varying character from Marble Arch to Tottenham Court Road. The strategy was developed from previous consultation responses, proposed plans and a process of engagement in order to identify and understand concerns and ideas.

    All of the proposals are our ideas as to what could be done to improve the area. Subject to the feedback we receive in the consultation, the council will then carry out the detailed technical work that would be needed to turn those preferred proposals into reality.

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  • Nine Elms Pimlico bridge

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Flyer says:
    Wandsworth Council is proposing a pedestrian and cycle bridge to
    connect Westminster and the new neighbourhood emerging in Nine Elms
    as well as the existing communities south of the river.
    The connection will improve access to this new shopping, restaurant and
    cultural district, as well as the new green spaces, thousands of jobs and
    Northern Line stations.
    Following consultation in 2017 on nine possible locations between
    Vauxhall and Chelsea bridges we have now selected three location
    options for further exploration.
    We want to find out what you think about this new car free bridge so are
    holding public exhibitions across Wandsworth, Westminster and Lambeth.
    Join us to learn more about the proposal and help shape one of London’s
    most exciting infrastructure projects. See the back of this leaflet for time
    and location details.
    You can also find out more and tell us your views online from Monday 5
    November

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  • Kilburn High Road Liveable Neighbourhood

    Henry Lancashire // 1 thread

    Info from survey:
    "The London Borough of Brent and Sustrans are working together to explore ways in which the Kilburn High Road and surrounding area shown could be improved. Together we want to better meet the needs of the community to make it a more desireable place to walk, cycle and enjoy being in.
    ...
    London Borough of Brent and London Borough of Camden will submit a joint application to Transport for London's Liveable Neighbourhood programme in November 2018, which will incorporate suggestions made by the community."

    Brent Cyclists are forming our own response, to be sent by end of October 2018.

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  • RBKC - Kensington & Chelsea borough-wide commonplace consultation for LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    What would you like to see improved in your local area?
    In the coming months, we will be putting together our Local Implementation Plan for the Royal Borough – the document that will form our transport and highways delivery plan for the next three years. It will show how we plan to deliver the Mayor of London’s transport strategy – especially its idea of “healthy streets”, with better air quality and more people walking and cycling.

    Adding your voice to our Commonplace consultation will help guide our aspirations and deliver improvements to your neighbourhood.

    What are we doing already?
    We are determined to continue to make the Royal Borough a brilliant place to live and work. In particular, we want to tackle the serious health problems caused by physical inactivity and air pollution, as well as improving the efficiency of our transport system as it faces the challenge of an ever-growing city. We are providing new cycle routes, improving pedestrian crossings, reducing traffic speeds, improving public places, and introducing more charging points for electric cars.

    Commonplace Consultation
    Share your ideas for changes – big and small – that would help more people to walk and cycle, improve conditions for bus passengers, make our roads safer and reduce pollution. Use our Commonplace consultation to drop a pin and tell us what your like or dislike about a street or place near you! You can also “like” comments made by other people. Spread the word – we want to hear from as many people as possible who live, work, or just travel through Kensington and Chelsea.

    The deadline to comment on the Local Implementation Plan is Friday 7 September.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • Holborn Junctions Road Safety and Public Realm Proposals

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    The consultation refers to a long-term aim to remove the Holborn gyratory within which there is very little provision for cycling.

    In the meantime it proposes some long-awaited safety measures at the Vernon Place junctions and some mainly pedestrian improvements at the Holborn tube station junction.

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • Permanent Timed Road Close on Macklin Street (St Joseph’s Primary School)

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    This consultation proposes to make permanent the first Healthy Streets scheme in Camden, which is at St Joseph’s School in Macklin Street, Covent Garden.

    An experimental timed closure was implemented in July 2016 through the use of street signage reinforced by a retractable bollard managed by school staff.  

    Camden notes that since the trial was introduced, the number of parents driving their children to school has reduced; and the school and some of its parents have also reported that they feel safer walking with their children to and from school.

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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