Things tagged 'consultation'

limited to the area of Westminster Cycling Campaign:

58 issues found for 'consultation':

  • Kensington & Chelsea LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    The Mayor of London published his Transport Strategy (MTS) in March 2018. The aim is for 80 per cent of all trips in London to be made on foot, by cycle or using public transport by 2041 (compared with 63 per cent in 2015).

    Our Third LIP sets out how we plan to implement the MTS locally as well as our other local transport-related priorities. LIPs are statutory documents and all London boroughs must prepare and submit their LIPs to Transport for London (TfL) for Mayor of London approval. See the MTS on the London.gov website.

    There are four main elements of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea's LIP:

    • A set of Borough Transport Objectives covering the 2019/20 to 2021/22 three-year LIP period and beyond.
    • The transport challenges and opportunities that we face in the borough.
    • A Delivery Plan of schemes, initiatives and policies covering the period 2019/20 to 2021/22.
    • LIP targets and delivery indicators.
    The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Commonplace survey

    To help shape the themes of our LIP we ran an online map-based ‘Commonplace’ survey during the summer of 2018, inviting people to tell us the kind of transport improvements they would like to see in their local area. See the online map.

    407 people responded to the question ‘What is your biggest concern about getting around on Kensington and Chelsea's streets? Amongst all respondents the top five concerns in descending order were:

    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • too much rat-running
    • congestion for cars

    Amongst those who stated that they lived in the borough the top five concerns were:

    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • congestion for cars
    • too much rat-running
    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    Key projects, policies and initiatives proposed in our LIP include:
    • considering pedestrians’ wish for ‘green man’ facilities at busy junctions, which will reduce traffic capacity and increase queues, even if these would not have the traditional road casualty based justification
    • consulting on introducing pilot 20 mph limits in some streets and areas
    • examining TfL's proposals to improve conditions for walking and cycling along the Holland Park Avenue/Notting Hill Gate/Bayswater Road corridor
    • introducing one or more ‘floating’ car clubs, which allow customers to make one-way trips, paying by the minute, without having to return the car to a dedicated bay
    • reviewing the case for taking on powers to enforce moving traffic offences, such as yellow box junctions and banned turns, to make sure road users observe traffic restrictions
    • a trial of part-time ‘school streets’ in which motor vehicle access is limited at school drop-off and pick-up times to encourage children to walk to school and improve safety
    • considering opportunities to introduce restrictions to move traffic away from residential roads in some circumstances
    • working with TfL to find sites for rapid electric vehicle chargers
    Send us your comments on our Draft LIP

    We welcome your views on our draft LIP and the Environmental Report. If you have any comments please complete the survey online or Alternatively  you can email them to lip3@rbkc.gov.uk or send them by post to:

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  • Brent LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Statutory and public consultation on their draft documents is a requirement for Boroughs preparing their Local Implementation Plans. The draft London Borough of Brent Local Implementation Transport Plan (LIP3) sets out how the Borough Council proposes to implement the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy at a local level in Brent. The plan uses the Borough’s Long Term Transport Strategy objectives and sets out how the future of transport for Brent will be provided up to 2041. It proposes a three-year programme of investment for the period 2019/20 - 2021/22. Under the Mayor’s Transport Strategy a further three year programme will be consulted on in the future. The full draft plan is available in the document section below. We would welcome your views on the draft LIP3 using this online questionnaire.

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  • Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood Projects

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    "As part of the Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood (LEN), Westminster City Council is proposing to introduce a number of new measures around Marylebone High Street and Paddington Street. These interventions will sit alongside the behaviour change measures already undertaken as part of the LEN programme."

    "Projects
    Details of these proposals are set out below, showing the existing and proposed arrangements, as well as information on the rationale. Once implemented, these proposals will be the first of their kind in Westminster. If you would like to comment on the proposals or have any questions, please email info@marylebonelen.org by 11.59pm on 5th December 2018. Responses will be considered before proceeding with the next stages of design and implementation."

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  • Westminster City Plan 2019-2040

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    Westminster City Council is consulting on its City Plan for the period 2019-2040. This is the Council's local plan, which sets out local planning policies and identifies how land is used, determining what will be built where.

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  • TfL's proposed changes to junctions along Edgware Road

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    From TfL webpage https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/edgware-road/ :
    "We are proposing changes to junctions along Edgware Road, between the Marylebone Flyover and Marble Arch, which will improve safety for pedestrians, and other road users.

    Our proposals include:

    - Creating new pedestrian crossings, with green and red man signals
    - Adding count down timers to new and existing crossings
    - Creating more space for pedestrians on the pavement
    - Limiting speed for vehicles to 20 miles per hour
    - Providing new Advanced Stop Lines (cycle boxes) for cyclists"

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  • Oxford Street District Place Strategy and Delivery Plan

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Westminster Council says:

    The draft strategy sets out a series of ambitious, exciting and also deliverable recommendations to significantly improve the district as a whole, with 96 projects across 87 different streets and spaces. We’ve also identified nine zones that reflect varying character from Marble Arch to Tottenham Court Road. The strategy was developed from previous consultation responses, proposed plans and a process of engagement in order to identify and understand concerns and ideas.

    All of the proposals are our ideas as to what could be done to improve the area. Subject to the feedback we receive in the consultation, the council will then carry out the detailed technical work that would be needed to turn those preferred proposals into reality.

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  • Nine Elms Pimlico bridge

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Flyer says:
    Wandsworth Council is proposing a pedestrian and cycle bridge to
    connect Westminster and the new neighbourhood emerging in Nine Elms
    as well as the existing communities south of the river.
    The connection will improve access to this new shopping, restaurant and
    cultural district, as well as the new green spaces, thousands of jobs and
    Northern Line stations.
    Following consultation in 2017 on nine possible locations between
    Vauxhall and Chelsea bridges we have now selected three location
    options for further exploration.
    We want to find out what you think about this new car free bridge so are
    holding public exhibitions across Wandsworth, Westminster and Lambeth.
    Join us to learn more about the proposal and help shape one of London’s
    most exciting infrastructure projects. See the back of this leaflet for time
    and location details.
    You can also find out more and tell us your views online from Monday 5
    November

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  • Kilburn High Road Liveable Neighbourhood

    Henry Lancashire // 1 thread

    Info from survey:
    "The London Borough of Brent and Sustrans are working together to explore ways in which the Kilburn High Road and surrounding area shown could be improved. Together we want to better meet the needs of the community to make it a more desireable place to walk, cycle and enjoy being in.
    ...
    London Borough of Brent and London Borough of Camden will submit a joint application to Transport for London's Liveable Neighbourhood programme in November 2018, which will incorporate suggestions made by the community."

    Brent Cyclists are forming our own response, to be sent by end of October 2018.

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  • RBKC - Kensington & Chelsea borough-wide commonplace consultation for LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    What would you like to see improved in your local area?
    In the coming months, we will be putting together our Local Implementation Plan for the Royal Borough – the document that will form our transport and highways delivery plan for the next three years. It will show how we plan to deliver the Mayor of London’s transport strategy – especially its idea of “healthy streets”, with better air quality and more people walking and cycling.

    Adding your voice to our Commonplace consultation will help guide our aspirations and deliver improvements to your neighbourhood.

    What are we doing already?
    We are determined to continue to make the Royal Borough a brilliant place to live and work. In particular, we want to tackle the serious health problems caused by physical inactivity and air pollution, as well as improving the efficiency of our transport system as it faces the challenge of an ever-growing city. We are providing new cycle routes, improving pedestrian crossings, reducing traffic speeds, improving public places, and introducing more charging points for electric cars.

    Commonplace Consultation
    Share your ideas for changes – big and small – that would help more people to walk and cycle, improve conditions for bus passengers, make our roads safer and reduce pollution. Use our Commonplace consultation to drop a pin and tell us what your like or dislike about a street or place near you! You can also “like” comments made by other people. Spread the word – we want to hear from as many people as possible who live, work, or just travel through Kensington and Chelsea.

    The deadline to comment on the Local Implementation Plan is Friday 7 September.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • Holborn Junctions Road Safety and Public Realm Proposals

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    The consultation refers to a long-term aim to remove the Holborn gyratory within which there is very little provision for cycling.

    In the meantime it proposes some long-awaited safety measures at the Vernon Place junctions and some mainly pedestrian improvements at the Holborn tube station junction.

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • Permanent Timed Road Close on Macklin Street (St Joseph’s Primary School)

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    This consultation proposes to make permanent the first Healthy Streets scheme in Camden, which is at St Joseph’s School in Macklin Street, Covent Garden.

    An experimental timed closure was implemented in July 2016 through the use of street signage reinforced by a retractable bollard managed by school staff.  

    Camden notes that since the trial was introduced, the number of parents driving their children to school has reduced; and the school and some of its parents have also reported that they feel safer walking with their children to and from school.

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • TfL's proposals for Grosvenor Place

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    Details of TfL’s proposals for Grosvenor Place can be found on the following webpage: https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/grosvenor-place/consult_view/
    "We are proposing road safety improvements on Grosvenor Place between Duke of Wellington Place and Wilton Street. Our proposals include new pedestrian crossings at the top of Grosvenor Place and measures designed to reduce collisions involving turning vehicles."

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  • Lambeth Bridge North & South

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:

    Overview:
    We have developed proposals to transform the road layout at the northern and southern roundabouts at Lambeth Bridge to create a safer environment for cycling and walking. We would also make changes to some approach roads and to the bridge itself.
    Focussing on road safety, our proposals are designed to keep traffic moving along these key routes, whilst providing a better balance to the way that space on the road is allocated.
    Our proposals would require changes to the way general traffic moves through the area, including new left or right turn traffic restrictions on some roads at each end of the bridge.

    What are we proposing?
    We propose to convert both the northern and the southern roundabouts of Lambeth Bridge into crossroad junctions, with traffic signals and signalised pedestrian crossings. At each junction, dedicated space would be given for cyclists and new pedestrian areas would be created.
    To support these transformational plans, changes to the road layout are also proposed on Lambeth Bridge itself, at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street and along Lambeth Palace Road. These layout changes include two general traffic lanes at each exit from the bridge, the introduction of a signalised pedestrian crossing at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street, and the extension of the southbound bus lane on Lambeth Palace Road.
    We have also developed public realm improvements, sensitive to the heritage of the area. These designs propose to further enhance the look and feel of the area so that we can promote a real sense of place to Lambeth Bridge and its surrounds.
    The Metropolitan Police Service has installed barriers to increase security on London’s busiest bridges. Our proposals will aim to ensure that the security of all road users is maintained in the future.

    We are also seeking views on:
    Longer-term plans for the pedestrian underpass at Albert Embankment
    A potential new location for the palm tree at Lambeth Bridge north
    The current traffic speed at Lambeth Bridge north and south

    Why are we proposing it?

    Safety
    Our proposals are designed to improve safety at both northern and southern roundabouts by introducing dedicated facilities for vulnerable road users, such as signalised pedestrian crossings, new cycle lanes and separate cycle signals. The northern roundabout in particular has a high proportion of collisions involving cyclists, and is one of 33 locations across London we are prioritising as part of our Safer Junctions programme.

    Healthy Streets to encourage walking and cycling
    The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. Both roundabouts and Lambeth Bridge are currently dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant places to walk and cycle. By giving cyclists space and time to pass through the junction more easily, and by providing new signalised crossings and clearer footways for pedestrians, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving.

    Building a local cycle network
    Lambeth Bridge and its roundabouts lie on busy cycle commuter routes. Making the area safer and more welcoming for cyclists would help build connections to existing infrastructure, such as Cycle Superhighway Route 8 on Millbank, and planned improvements, such as Westminster Bridge and Central London Grid routes. The following map shows how our proposals would build on cycling connectivity in the area.

    The impacts of our proposals

    Journey times
    Our proposals have been designed to not have a disproportionate impact on other road users. However we expect there would be changes, both positive and negative, to journey times for motorists, bus passengers and cyclists.
    More detailed information on the traffic impacts of the Lambeth Bridge proposals, including tables of the likely journey time impacts, can be found here https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/lambeth-bridge/user_uploads/traffic-impacts-and-data-table.pdf
    Should these proposals go ahead, we would take a number of steps to ensure that the changes made along the route are balanced. We are investing in advanced traffic signal technology to allow us to better manage traffic depending on differing conditions at any given time.

    Turning restrictions
    Our proposals include a number of restrictions to turning movements:

    ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Millbank north
    A time-of-day banned right-turn from Millbank south onto Lambeth Bridge during the evening peak
    A banned left-turn for northbound traffic from Millbank south into Horseferry Road
    ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Horseferry Road
    A banned left-turn from Lambeth Palace Road onto Lambeth Road.
    A banned right-turn from Lambeth Road onto Lambeth Palace Road.
    We do not develop proposals to introduce traffic restrictions without carefully considering the potential impacts and exploring alternative solutions. The restrictions are proposed either to address a safety issue or to help the signalised junction operate more efficiently, minimising potential journey time delays to road users.

    The environment

    Air and noise
    Although the designs for Lambeth Bridge north and south are not expected to increase the number of motor vehicles in the area, our proposals may change how traffic moves around some roads, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals.

    Tree removal
    Our proposals require the removal or relocation of a number of trees in order to accommodate the new road layout:
    The iconic phoenix palm tree at the centre of the roundabout on the northern side of Lambeth Bridge would look to be relocated
    Seven trees at the centre of the roundabout on the southern side of Lambeth Bridge would need to be removed
    One tree at the junction of Millbank and Great Peter Street would need to be removed
    New trees will be planted at Lambeth Bridge north and south as part of proposed urban realm improvements. Subject to the outcome of consultation, tree species would be determined during detailed design.

    Visual environment
    Our proposed urban realm improvements aim to improve the look and feel of the area, as shown in our artists’ impressions.

    Features include:
    Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing pedestrians and cyclists to better enjoy the area
    Increasing the surface area of the public realm by approximately 1,370 square metres at Lambeth Bridge north and approximately 1,790 square metres at Lambeth Bridge south
    Attracting more visitors to the area and local attractions such as Victoria Tower Gardens
    Planting new trees bringing overall benefits for the area’s biodiversity and landscape
    Providing new seating
    New footway materials to improve the look of the streets along Albert Embankment, Lambeth Palace Road, Millbank and Lambeth Bridge
    The removal of unnecessary and duplicate poles, signs and other street furniture
    Upgrades where necessary to existing lighting and drainage
    Provision of more cycle parking
    An opportunity to provide additional Cycle Hire stations
    Upgraded wayfinding for example to Newport Street Gallery
    Equalities
    In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, we:

    Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EqIA), to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people
    Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (amongst many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Age Concern, Transport for All, and the National Autistic Society
    Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people
    The EqIA for Lambeth Bridge north and south will continue to be developed following the outcome of this public consultation, incorporating feedback received.

    Other options considered but not taken forward
    We considered a number of alternative designs before taking forward our current proposals.
    At Lambeth Bridge south, we considered retaining the roundabout, but this provided minimal benefits for cyclists. We also considered ‘hold the left’ turn facilities on Lambeth Road and Lambeth Bridge, which separate cyclists from other traffic with separate traffic signals. However this scenario would have caused significant traffic queueing due to the extra signal phase required and was difficult to accommodate due to the structure of the bridge.
    We also considered a number of designs at Lambeth Bridge north including a signalised junction and a ‘Dutch style’ roundabout with a physically separated cycle track around the edge of the roundabout. However, our modelling indicated that this would have had significant impact on journey times for other road users in the area, including thousands of bus passengers.
    Having considered a number of designs, we believe the current proposals would achieve the best balance for all road users.

    Related schemes
    Lambeth north interim scheme
    During March 2017, we delivered interim safety improvements at Lambeth Bridge northern roundabout.
    The changes were timed to bring improvements whilst we continued with plans to re-work the junction's layout for the long-term.

    Next steps
    Subject to the outcome of this consultation, should we proceed with these proposals, we would look to start construction in late 2018.
    Although construction would cause some disruption, we would take steps to minimise this as far as possible.
    Building in late 2018 would allow us to coordinate with major planned maintenance work on Lambeth Bridge, and with work currently taking place at Westminster Bridge South.

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  • Circle Line North Quietway in Westminster

    Created by Colin Wing // 6 threads

    This is the route of the Circle Line North Quietway in Westminster. It bears some resemblance to the existing London Cycle Network Route marked '40' on the map; but it misses Paddington Station, as well as some difficult one-way sections between Paddington and Crawford Street.

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