Issues

This section lists issues - problems on the street network and related matters.

Issues always relate to some geographical location, whether very local or perhaps city-wide.

You can create a new issue using the button on the right.

Listed issues, most recent first, limited to the area of Westminster Cycling Campaign:

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  • Riding House Street Public Realm Improvements

    Created by Colin Wing // 1 thread

    The proposals are:

    • Formalised permanent road closure at east end of Riding House Street.
    • Creation of a pedestrian zone with a flush surface throughout paved with two tone concrete paving.
    • Benches and planting to improve public amenity and change the nature of Riding House Street from a road to a functional pedestrian space.
    • Removal of the existing zebra crossing as it is no longer required. An informal pedestrian route between All Souls School sites is highlighted in the proposed paving pattern.
    • Cycle parking facilities.
    • Two-way operation to the east of Nassau Street to maintain access to motorcycle parking and for servicing vehicles.

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  • Cycleway Shepherd's Bush to Notting Hill

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Council says:

    Encouraging cycling is one of the Council’s borough transport objectives. We want to make sure cycling is safe, easy, attractive and inclusive for all. We are also concerned about the impacts of poor air quality on our residents, and believe making cycle trips safer is part of the solution to providing alternatives to motor vehicle trips. We hope that new and existing cyclists alike will appreciate being able to use clearly signed routes along quiet side streets.

    We are consulting on a new cycle route - incorporating a section of route we have already consulted on - which serves our communities in Shepherd’s Bush, Holland Park and Notting Hill Gate. The route has been co-designed alongside major resident's associations and local cycling champions.

    The route begins at Holland Park Roundabout, passes through the large paved space between Holland Park Roundabout and Norland Road, then progresses the length of Queensdale Road until it joins a route that we have previously consulted on, and which we will be building in mid-2020.  The new route then picks up again at Clarendon Road, turns into St John’s Gardens and along Lansdowne Crescent before crossing Ladbroke Grove and into Kensington Park Gardens.  Crossing Kensington Park Road, it progresses down Chepstow Villas before meeting a route due for implementation by May 2020.  Please see the cycle route map below for the full alignment.

    In general, the measures that we are proposing are designed to reduce the speed and volume of traffic – where our surveys have suggested these are higher than permitted under TfL’s Cycle Route Quality Criteria – and to reduce the risk of conflict at junctions. The route does not propose fully segregated cycle lanes along the alignment, apart from on the approach to the Kensington Park Road junction. As with all our cycle routes, if implemented, the route will be monitored annually to ensure our proposals have secured the levels of speed and traffic volume appropriate to a cycleway.

    We are asking what you think of our proposals regarding the new cycleway. Please read the following information carefully before filling in the questionnaire no later than 22 March 2020.

    Proposed changes

    At the junction of Queensdale Road/St Ann’s Villas, a new raised table is proposed, aiming to encourage drivers to slow down where cyclists and pedestrians are crossing. 

    On Lansdowne Road, at the junction with St John’s Gardens, we are proposing to permit two-way cycling in this section of one-way road. To facilitate this, we propose to cut back the build out on the western side, providing more carriageway space to allow a short section of cycle lane. This short lane will help warn drivers that the road is two-way for cyclists, and encourage cyclists and vehicles to correctly position themselves at this junction. 

    Where Lansdowne Crescent meets Ladbroke Grove, we are proposing to close Lansdowne Crescent to enable cyclists to safely reach a new proposed parallel crossing facility across the busy Ladbroke Grove. Vehicles will still be able to use St John’s Gardens. To facilitate a new turning circle for vehicles at the proposed ‘cul-de-sac’ end of Lansdowne Crescent, we are proposing removal of three resident parking bays.

    To allow cyclists to cross Ladbroke Grove, we are proposing upgrading the current zebra crossing to a parallel crossing (that can be used by both pedestrians and cyclists) and extensions to the footways on the eastern side to provide small areas of shared-space footway.

    On Kensington Park Gardens, where traffic speeds are on the high side, we are proposing three sinusoidal road humps and an entry treatment at the junction with Ladbroke Grove. Sinusoidal humps are designed so that when driving or cycling over them at lower speeds, they are more comfortable to drive over than traditional humps, but if travelling at an inappropriate speed, they cause a noticeable ‘bump,’ encouraging slower speeds. We know that some people are concerned that road humps contribute to poor air quality, when they lead to drivers braking and accelerating hard. We have designed the proposals in line with government guidance on the correct spacing between the humps to avoid hard braking and acceleration. We have recently introduced sinusoidal humps in St James’s Gardens and we also use them when we resurface roads with traditional humps – for example, Abbotsbury Road already features some sinusoidal humps. 

    We are proposing some restrictions at the junction of Kensington Park Gardens/Kensington Park Road/Chepstow Villas, where traffic flows are high on both Chepstow Villas and Kensington Park Road

    Kensington Park Gardens will be entry only from Kensington Park Road. Traffic will still be able to access and exit Kensington Park Gardens at the western junction with Ladbroke Grove.

    At the junction of Kensington Park Road and Chepstow Villas, traffic exiting Chepstow Villas will have to turn left (south). Traffic would not be able to enter Chepstow Villas from Kensington Park Road, but vehicles will be still be able to access and exit Chepstow Villas at the eastern junction with Portobello Road

    These proposals would reduce rat-running through Chepstow Villas and Kensington Park Gardens and enable the introduction of a short section of segregated bi-directional cycle path and a new parallel ‘tiger’ crossing for pedestrians and cyclists across Kensington Park Road. We are also proposing some changes to the planting in Chepstow Villas, with the addition of new planters and potentially a rain garden. Should the proposals go ahead, we will monitor the effects of any traffic displacement carefully to see if further changes are required on neighbouring roads.

    At the junction of Chepstow Villas/Portobello Road - where we know many of our residents and tourists cross regularly to explore Portobello Road - we are proposing a raised table and footway extensions to encourage slower vehicle speeds where cyclists and pedestrians are crossing the junction. 

    What happens next?

    A full report of the results of the consultation will be presented to the Executive Director for Environment and Communities, who will then make a decision on whether the proposed changes should be implemented. 

    After this consultation, should the initial response be positive, the Council will be carrying out further statutory consultation in order to amend traffic orders to facilitate implementation of the proposals.

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  • Highway Code changes

    sound+fury // 1 thread

    A bill is being put forward to sentence any cyclist convicted of dangerous cycling to a 14 year prison term.

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  • Travel in London Report

    Created by Simon Parker // 1 thread

    A lack of a clearly defined, well planned cycling network is hindering the growth of cycling in London.

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  • TfL Safer Junctions - Edgware Road and Harrow Road consultation

    Created by Dominic Fee // 1 thread

    Shortened description from TfL webpage https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/edgware-road-junction/:

    "We would like to know your views on proposals for the junction of Edgware Road and Harrow Road in the Paddington/Marylebone area.

    Background

    Our Safer Junctions programme is reducing road danger at some of the most hazardous junctions in London. These junctions have high collision rates for vulnerable road users, including people walking and cycling. This programme directly contributes to our Vision Zero target to stop people from dying and being seriously injured on London’s road network by 2041.

    The objectives of the Safer Junction programme are to:

    - Reduce road danger and help eliminate Killed and Seriously Injured (KSI) collisions
    - Help create streets where people feel safe to walk, cycle and use public transport
    - Make hostile junctions more welcoming and less dominated by motor vehicles, demonstrating the Healthy Streets Approach

    Why we are consulting

    In the last three years there were 29 personal injury collisions, of which five resulted in serious injuries (17.2%).

    A number of issues have been identified with the current junction layout:

    - Pedestrians not using designated crossing points
    - Existing pedestrian islands are narrow
    - There is a lack of cycle facilities, especially southbound where the road layout is not cycle friendly

    Our proposals

    We would like your views on the following proposals which aim to reduce the above issues.

    Applies to the whole junction

    - Introduce a 20mph speed limit across the junction
    - Widen all pedestrian crossings to make for a more comfortable and safer crossing

    North of the flyover

    - Ban left turn from Harrow Road into Edgware Road northbound
    - Build out northwest corner to remove slip road and provide a better pedestrian environment
    - Convert staggered crossing to straight across crossing to create better and safer routes to and from Edgware Road Bakerloo line station
    - Make Bell Street no exit onto Edgware Road
    - Change current three lane road layout to two traffic lanes and a cycle lane through the junction
    - Widen southbound bus lane to 4.5m as it passes the bus stop
    - Install cyclist early start signal on southbound Edgware Road

    South of the flyover

    - Convert the short section of Edgware Road northbound bus lane beneath the flyover, into cycle lane
    - Install a cyclist early start signal at the junction heading northbound on Edgware Road
    - On Harrow Road westbound reduce the road width to two lanes by building out the footway on the southwest corner, to provide a better pedestrian environment
    - Reduce the width of the westbound slip road from Marylebone Road to one 4.5m lane by building out the footway on the southeast corner of the junction to provide better pedestrian environment
    - Remove the guardrail and narrow the pedestrian island of the pedestrian crossing to the south of the flyover to allow for an 8.0m width on the southbound Edgware Road to prevent traffic merging with cyclists

    Additional proposals for the area around the junction

    These proposals are not part of the Safer Junction improvements. However, opportunities have been identified to improve air quality and priority space for buses in the area and we would like to know your views on these additional proposals.

    Improving the road layout for northbound buses

    Just north of the Edgware Road/Harrow Road Junction the road narrows and creates a bottleneck for traffic.

    Changing the footpath layout here allows for the bus lane to be extended north of Newcastle Place, removing the bottleneck for northbound buses."

    Westminster Cycling Campaign will be preparing and submitting a response to this consultation, and we will be grateful for any comments you provide. TfL usually describes responses in quantitative terms, e.g. 'XX% of reponses supported or strongly supported the proposals', so we therefore encourage you to submit your own response too.

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  • Safe speeds for central London – introducing 20mph speed limits

    Created by Sean Howes // 1 thread

    Overview

    We want your views on our proposals to make the streets we manage in central London 20mph by 2020 and the associated measures.

    Last year, in partnership with the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), we published the Vision Zero Action Plan. The Action Plan sets out our ambition to eliminate death and serious injury from London’s transport network by 2041.

    It details our plans to reduce road danger, including proposals to implement a 20mph speed limit on the roads we operate and manage in central London. 

    We’ve been working to determine the most effective way of implementing the new speed limits and are now ready to share our plans with you.

    We’ve provided more information about our proposals on this page and would like your feedback before we progress this important safety programme.

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  • The Royal Parks' draft Movement Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    The Royal Park says:
    "The Royal Parks is embarking on an exciting and ambitious journey to develop a Movement Strategy that will influence movement and transportation throughout our parks and London.

    What is the Movement Strategy?

    The Movement Strategy will set a long-term vision for how park visitors will move within, access and subsequently experience the parks.

    The strategy will include a comprehensive exploration of all movement and access related issues and opportunities that are relevant to the parks both now and into the foreseeable future.

    This will include (but is not limited to) increasing safety for all park users, reducing the impact of vehicle-based traffic and reducing conflict between different modes.

    How will it be developed?

    To develop the strategy, we will utilise an evidence-based approach to explore all current and future movement opportunities. Input from key stakeholders, including the general public, will be a critical component in exploring possibilities, conflicts and issues that will inform the creation of the strategy.

    Engagement Phase One – Now Open.

    We are seeking input from key partners including the general public, Transport for London, neighbouring boroughs and all interested parties. This input is a critical component in exploring possibilities, conflicts and issues that will inform the creation of the strategy.This discussion paper sets out the draft aim and principles for our Movement Strategy. These summarise our aspirations and provide the basis for developing a series of bold projects and proposals across all eight parks."

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  • Holborn Vision and Urban Strategy Consultation

    Created by George Coulouris // 1 thread

    Camden Council has prepared a draft Vision and Urban Strategy for Holborn and they are running a public consultation open to local residents, businesses, workers, community groups, and everyone else who has an interest in the area.  Their primary aim is to produce a Planning Strategy document to guide Camden's Planning Committee's decisions on construction projects in the area.

    We intend to submit a response by the Cycling Campaign because it clearly interacts with and should complement the Holborn Liveable Neighbourhood Scheme for which funding of around £12m has been announced by TFL and Camden.  The draft for the Vision and Urban Strategy references the Liveable Neighbourhood Scheme and outlines its main proposed actions including the proposed segregated cycle tracks on New Oxford Street and Theobolds Road, so there is no reason to fear a conflict. But the responses to this consultation may have some implications for the LN, so we should respond stating our priorities. 

    Both schemes propose the removal of the Holborn gyratory and the closure of its Procter Street arm creating a traffic free space there instead.

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  • Proposed improvements between Wood Lane and Notting Hill Gate

    TfL says:

    We want your views on our proposals to transform roads in west London through four connected neighbourhood improvement schemes between Wood Lane and Notting Hill Gate.

    The proposals are an important part of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The proposals are guided by the Mayor's Healthy Streets Approach, which aims to encourage walking, cycling and public transport and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant. The proposals are also an important part of the Mayor's Walking and Cycling Action Plans. These complementary plans set out how we and London boroughs will work to increase the number of people walking and cycling, helping to address poor air quality and congestion, while improving infrastructure to make walking and cycling even easier, safer and more accessible for everyone.

    These proposals would provide benefits for road users and communities in these areas, making it easier to cross busy roads, removing through traffic on some residential roads and offering a segregated space for people to cycle in west London. They would form part of London’s emerging cycling network and create a more appealing street environment for everyone to enjoy.

    The proposals include:

    • New and upgraded pedestrian crossings
    • Public space improvements along the route to create more welcoming streets for people and communities to enjoy
    • Two-way segregated cycle track throughout
    • Changes to bus stop locations, with removal of some, and layout changes throughout, including new bus stop bypasses for cyclists
    • Making some side roads entry or exit only to help the safe and timely movement of traffic
    • Removal of some trees in Notting Hill Gate and Holland Park Avenue to accommodate the facilities with appropriate new trees planted nearby
    • Changes to parking and loading bays and hours of operation  

    The proposed changes presented in this consultation are not final. We welcome your views on our proposals and your feedback will inform how we progress the schemes.

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  • Pembridge Square to Meanwhile Gardens Cycle Route

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Pembridge Square to Meanwhile Gardens Cycle Route Consultation

    The Council wants to create high quality cycle routes for people who have considered cycling, but been put off by the idea of sharing busy roads with lorries and buses. We hope that many existing cyclists will also appreciate being able to use clear, direct routes along quiet side streets.

    We are consulting on a new cycle route, linking the existing cycle route known as Quietway 2 in Notting Hill to the route along the Grand Union Canal. It begins at Pembridge Square, crosses Pembridge Villas/Pembridge Road and runs along Pembridge Crescent, Denbigh Road, Colville Road, Colville Gardens, Clydesdale Road, All Saints Rd, Tavistock Crescent, passes under the Westway then along Acklam Road, St Ervan’s Road, Golborne Road and in to Meanwhile Gardens where cyclists can connect to the existing cycle route along the canal towpath. In general, the measures that we are proposing are designed to slow down traffic, or to reduce the risk of conflict at junctions.

    Complete the survey

    We are asking what you think of our proposals regarding the new cycle route. Please read the following information carefully before filling in the survey no later than 29 March 2019. For further information, please contact cycling@rbkc.gov.uk or call 020 7361 3766.

    Proposed changes

    On the southern section of Pembridge Square, we are proposing three sinusoidal humps to reduce traffic speeds. Sinusoidal humps are designed so that when driving or cycling over them at lower speeds, they are more comfortable to drive over than traditional humps, but if travelling at an inappropriate speed, they cause a notable ‘bump’, encouraging slower speeds. We know that some people are concerned that road humps contribute to poor air quality, when they lead to drivers braking and accelerating hard. We have designed the proposals in line with government guidance on the correct spacing between the humps to avoid hard braking and acceleration. We have recently introduced sinusoidal humps in St James’s Gardens and we also use them when we resurface roads with traditional humps – for example, in Abbotsbury Road near Holland Park.  

    To the western end of Pembridge Square, where there is a very large expanse of asphalt, we are proposing a new island with planting, and clearer road markings to clarify how vehicles should navigate this section of the square.

    To allow less confident cyclists to cross Pembridge Villas/Pembridge Road, we are proposing to convert the existing pedestrian crossing to a parallel crossing. Parallel crossings combine a pedestrian zebra with a crossing for people travelling by bicycle, so that people attempting to cross on bikes enjoy the same priority as pedestrians. We have installed similar crossings with success on North Pole Road and King’s Road.

    The proposed design also includes widening the pavements on either side of this proposed crossing to provide more space for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as reducing the crossing distance. Raising the level of the carriageway on the two side roads to pavement level at the junction with Pembridge Road, Pembridge Square and Pembridge Crescent would also help to discourage high speeds and provide a more comfortable crossing for pedestrians. 

    On Westbourne Grove, we propose moving the bus stop road markings slightly further away from the junction with Denbigh Road. This will involve the loss of one parking space, but would allow greater visibility of oncoming traffic for all road users exiting Denbigh Road. Introducing double yellow lines around this junction would further increase visibility for all road users by discouraging inappropriate parking. We also propose to re-work the pedestrian crossing so that it better aligns with the carriageway of Colville Road.  

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  • Kensington & Chelsea LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    The Mayor of London published his Transport Strategy (MTS) in March 2018. The aim is for 80 per cent of all trips in London to be made on foot, by cycle or using public transport by 2041 (compared with 63 per cent in 2015).

    Our Third LIP sets out how we plan to implement the MTS locally as well as our other local transport-related priorities. LIPs are statutory documents and all London boroughs must prepare and submit their LIPs to Transport for London (TfL) for Mayor of London approval. See the MTS on the London.gov website.

    There are four main elements of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea's LIP:

    • A set of Borough Transport Objectives covering the 2019/20 to 2021/22 three-year LIP period and beyond.
    • The transport challenges and opportunities that we face in the borough.
    • A Delivery Plan of schemes, initiatives and policies covering the period 2019/20 to 2021/22.
    • LIP targets and delivery indicators.
    The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Commonplace survey

    To help shape the themes of our LIP we ran an online map-based ‘Commonplace’ survey during the summer of 2018, inviting people to tell us the kind of transport improvements they would like to see in their local area. See the online map.

    407 people responded to the question ‘What is your biggest concern about getting around on Kensington and Chelsea's streets? Amongst all respondents the top five concerns in descending order were:

    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • too much rat-running
    • congestion for cars

    Amongst those who stated that they lived in the borough the top five concerns were:

    • pollution
    • speed of traffic
    • congestion for cars
    • too much rat-running
    • cycling doesn’t feel safe
    Key projects, policies and initiatives proposed in our LIP include:
    • considering pedestrians’ wish for ‘green man’ facilities at busy junctions, which will reduce traffic capacity and increase queues, even if these would not have the traditional road casualty based justification
    • consulting on introducing pilot 20 mph limits in some streets and areas
    • examining TfL's proposals to improve conditions for walking and cycling along the Holland Park Avenue/Notting Hill Gate/Bayswater Road corridor
    • introducing one or more ‘floating’ car clubs, which allow customers to make one-way trips, paying by the minute, without having to return the car to a dedicated bay
    • reviewing the case for taking on powers to enforce moving traffic offences, such as yellow box junctions and banned turns, to make sure road users observe traffic restrictions
    • a trial of part-time ‘school streets’ in which motor vehicle access is limited at school drop-off and pick-up times to encourage children to walk to school and improve safety
    • considering opportunities to introduce restrictions to move traffic away from residential roads in some circumstances
    • working with TfL to find sites for rapid electric vehicle chargers
    Send us your comments on our Draft LIP

    We welcome your views on our draft LIP and the Environmental Report. If you have any comments please complete the survey online or Alternatively  you can email them to lip3@rbkc.gov.uk or send them by post to:

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  • Don't pedestrianise Fitzrovia - make it access only

    Created by linus // 1 thread

    Westminster council are doing two important things at the moment. There is a consultation on "Oxford Street District" here: https://osd.london

    The other thing WCC are doing is going to close Riding House Street with the Camden boundary at the junction of Cleveland Street by installing bollards across the road. The street has already been closed for over a year and it has had no negative impact. Camden have already done this at Fitzroy Square and Warren Street and it has been very positive. We need to do more of the same.

    The issue of through traffic -- including Torrington Place -- needs to be dealt with as a matter of urgency. All areas of Fitzrovia are above the legal limit for NO2, except for Crabtree Fields open space. (Sample readings: 55 µg/m3 - legal limit is 40 µg/m3. NO2 pollution on Oxford Street east is 66 µg/m3 & on Euston Road it is 84 µg/m3.)

    Camden has so far refused to entertain the two road closures I have suggested - Torrington Place and Goodge Place.

    I am now going to suggest the following road closures to Camden and Westminster to make Fitzrovia "access only".

    Close Goodge Street at Westminster boundary at junction with Goodge Place; close New Cavendish Street at the junction with Cleveland Street, and finally close Clipstone Street at the junction with Cleveland Street (this would also require Cleveland Street to be one-way north bound).

    I believe it will not impact on access to all streets by motor vehicles for deliveries and drop-offs, etc. But it will eliminate entirely motor through traffic across the Camden/Westminster border and mitigate the effect of Gower Street northbound traffic turning into Torrington Place. This would also cut down on traffic along Grafton Way which also a victim of WEP.

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  • Brent LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Statutory and public consultation on their draft documents is a requirement for Boroughs preparing their Local Implementation Plans. The draft London Borough of Brent Local Implementation Transport Plan (LIP3) sets out how the Borough Council proposes to implement the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy at a local level in Brent. The plan uses the Borough’s Long Term Transport Strategy objectives and sets out how the future of transport for Brent will be provided up to 2041. It proposes a three-year programme of investment for the period 2019/20 - 2021/22. Under the Mayor’s Transport Strategy a further three year programme will be consulted on in the future. The full draft plan is available in the document section below. We would welcome your views on the draft LIP3 using this online questionnaire.

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  • Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood Projects

    "As part of the Marylebone Low Emission Neighbourhood (LEN), Westminster City Council is proposing to introduce a number of new measures around Marylebone High Street and Paddington Street. These interventions will sit alongside the behaviour change measures already undertaken as part of the LEN programme."

    "Projects
    Details of these proposals are set out below, showing the existing and proposed arrangements, as well as information on the rationale. Once implemented, these proposals will be the first of their kind in Westminster. If you would like to comment on the proposals or have any questions, please email info@marylebonelen.org by 11.59pm on 5th December 2018. Responses will be considered before proceeding with the next stages of design and implementation."

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